Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

 

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Chariteplatz 1
10117 Berlin
Germany

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Project Leaders

PD Dr. med. Dr. phil. Martin Ebinger

PD Dr. med. Dr. phil. Martin Ebinger
Principal Investigator
Phone: +49 (0)30 450560137
Fax: +49 (0)30 450560932

Contact

 

Prof. Dr. med. Matthias Endres

Prof. Dr. med. Matthias Endres
Principal Investigator
Phone: +49 (0)30 450560257
Fax: +49 (0)30 450560932

Contact

PD Dr. med. Jochen B. Fiebach

PD Dr. med. Jochen B. Fiebach
Principal Investigator/ Workpackage Leader WP 2
Phone: +49 (0)30 84454088
Fax: +49 (0)30 84454099

Contact

 

Project Staff

Dr. med. MSc Ivana Galinovic

Dr. med. MSc Ivana Galinovic
Central reader (imaging)
Phone: +49 (0)30 84454174
Fax: +49 (0)30 84454099

Contact

 

Dipl.-Biol. Kati Jegzentis

Dipl.-Biol. Kati Jegzentis
Central trial management/ trial monitoring
Phone: +49 (0)30 84454144
Fax: +49 (0)30 84454099 

Contact

PD Dr. Karl Georg Häusler
Recruiting – Leader of the CSB trial team
Phone: +49 (0)30 8445 4244

Contact

Linda Faye Tidwell
National Coordinator of German Centers
Phone: +49 (0)30 450560142

Contact

Claudia Kunze
Public relations
Phone: +49 (0)30 84454118
Fax: +49 (0)30 84454099

Contact

Dr. rer. nat. Jens Steinbrink
Scientific personnel/ CSB management
Phone: +49 (0)30 450560601
Fax: +49 (0)30 450560952

Contact

Company Presentation

With more than 160 Neurology beds the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, is one of Europe’s biggest university hospitals. The Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB) is an integrated research and treatment centre at the Charité sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The CSB performs both clinical and experimental stroke studies and has extensive expertise in the field of MRI-based thrombolysis. Our CSB trial team is involved in numerous stroke trials and we operate our own 3T scanner in direct vicinity to one of our largest stroke units (24 beds). Together with the Berlin Fire-Department, we also run a stroke ambulance (STEMO) equipped with a CT scanner for pre-hospital stroke care including treatment with tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA).

In the years before the WAKE-UP trial, we critically studied the usefulness of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence (FLAIR) in acute ischemic stroke. We initially investigated its relevance for timing of strokes with unknown time of onset. We then continued to explore the predictive value of FLAIR for clinical and imaging outcomes in patients treated with tPA. For instance, we recently observed that the combination of FLAIR hyperintensities in arteries and parenchyma (FRAP-sign) is associated with poor outcomes after tPA within 4.5 hours. During most of these projects - including the pooled analysis of the PRE-FLAIR data published in Lancet Neurology in 2011 - we collaborated closely with our colleagues in Hamburg, the sponsor of the WAKE-UP trial.

Leading the Work Package 2 (define imaging standards, training), we are proud to be part of this multi-centre European trial and happy to coordinate and assist the recruitment sites throughout Germany.

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